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#6463 - 12/07/09 05:29 PM Here's Mud in Your Cup
ryck Offline


Registered: 08/04/09
Loc: Okanagan Valley
Given the number of posts that are either late night or early morning I think it's safe to assume that we have our share of coffee drinkers. I'm tiring of the same old-same old that I've been drinking and, having just bought a skookum new coffee maker, I figured it's time to see what others are doing to ensure coffee enjoyment.

My coffee profile is:

I like a plain cup of coffee that just tastes good. Subjective, yes, but it means I'm not a Starbucks-style connoisseur. In fact, I've only been there a few times and have never had a coffee I liked. I haven't tried the fancy ones.

If you've tried Tim Horton's - that's a coffee I really like.

So, what are you doing? Buying in small amounts to preserve freshness? Grinding your own beans? Adding chicory?

ryck
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#6465 - 12/07/09 05:57 PM Re: Here's Mud in Your Cup [Re: ryck]
jchuzi Online


Registered: 08/04/09
Loc: New York State
Funny that you should post this, Ryck, because I have been tempted to start a coffee thread also. My wife and I are coffee mavens and we detest Starbucks. Starbucks coffee is over-roasted to the point that you only taste charcoal rather than real coffee. It's a good way to disguise mediocre beans.

We really like the coffee from Oren's Daily Roast and buy it regularly in the bean. Our experience shows that there are several factors to getting a good cup:

1. Start with quality coffee. If you drink commercial stuff (Maxwell House, Yuban, etc.), you'll get coffee that is mostly Coffea robusta. Robusta is high in caffeine but low in taste. The best coffee is Coffea arabica, grown in several parts of the world and it differs markedly in flavor, depending upon its point of origin. The skill of the roaster is also critical. We prefer the Full City Roast that Oren's uses but be aware that the names of different roasts are not standardized.

2. Since your cup is mostly water, the quality of your water is critical. Often, tap water is fine but you may want to experiment with bottled water.

3. Coffee is best when freshly ground. We buy whole beans and freeze them, then grind only the amount that we need to make a pot. We grind the frozen beans and they thaw instantly during the grinding process. The beans seem to keep indefinitely when frozen.

4. The consistency of the grind is crucial. Cheap grinders that work like a blender (rotary grinders) cannot give any consistency, even if you time them. Burr grinders can produce much more consistency because you can dial in the specific grind that you like. In addition, the beans don't get burned because they are ejected into a hopper immediately after being ground and don't come in contact anymore with the burrs. Inexpensive burr grinders do a better job than rotary grinders but if you want good quality, you should spend some money. We use the Maestro Plus grinder and it made a big difference over our Braun grinder. The link is to Oren's site but there are many sources for this grinder.

5. There are various methods of brewing coffee and personal taste dictates the one that you use. We prefer the drip method and use, of all things, a now-defunct KitchenAid 4-cup maker that had a reputation as the finest 4-cupper ever made. I originally read about it at Coffee Geek and sought it out on eBay and QVC. I ended up buying 6 of them because they were discontinued. So far, I have only used one and the remaining 5 are in storage, just in case. Many people like the French Press method but I find it too difficult to control.

In January, when we celebrate our 42nd anniversary, we may treat ourselves to the Technivorm maker in the configuration that has a glass carafe. Our experience with stainless steel carafes has been disappointing. The reviews of Technivorm at Coffee Geek are mostly raves.

Here are some other coffee sites:

Terroir Coffee. George Howell, the owner, has a reputation as one of the finest coffee purveyors and connoisseurs of the bean. We used to patronize his place, The Coffee Connection, in Cambridge, MA years ago. Unfortunately, George sold the place to Starbucks. At that time, Starbucks wasn't as bad as it is now.

If you're a fan of espresso, look into Torrefazione. They make the best espresso beans that we have ever tried.

Peet's is OK if you like dark roasts. Dark roasts are common on the West coast but not popular in the East. To my taste, Peet's coffee is better than Starbucks but much too dark.

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#6473 - 12/07/09 08:33 PM Re: Here's Mud in Your Cup [Re: jchuzi]
alternaut Offline

Moderator

Registered: 08/04/09
If you're going Dutch with your coffee maker, try a Senseo machine with Douwe Egberts coffee to handle your 'snack' coffee cravings. The Senseo offers a simple solution to what I consider coffee's biggest problem: sitting around. Its one mug or two cup yield leaves nothing behind to get stale, and it's fast enough for a really fresh refill. tongue

Whatever you use, only drink freshly made coffee. If you absolutely have to keep it around, do so at exactly 83°C (181°F) for no longer than about half an hour, unless you want your taste buds to secede. smirk
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#6483 - 12/08/09 02:18 AM Re: Here's Mud in Your Cup [Re: ryck]
grelber Offline


Registered: 08/05/09
Loc: North of 49th ||
I'm like ryck ... I enjoy a nice cuppa joe, in fact several, when I approach the day, starting off online.
I generally make 2 half-pots of drip coffee (re freshness criterion) in a 12-cup coffee maker. I had a Proctor-Silex Coffee-Magic 12-Cup Automatic Drip Coffeemaker for 20+ years – a Consumer Reports best buy – before it gave up the ghost.
I'm now using a Black & Decker SmartBrew 12-Cup Coffeemaker, Model DCM2000 – with equally good results.
Given the amount of coffee I drink, I developed a caffeine addiction which resulted in migraine-like headaches if I went over 12 hours without caffeinated coffee. Bummer. So I've had to shift to my preferences.
As for coffee, I buy arabicas off the shelf, ie commercially ground and roasted and packaged in hermetically sealed tins My preference is for espresso or dark roast. I mix caffeinated and (water-extraction) decaffeinated in equal amounts to achieve lower caffeine levels without disturbing my taste buds.

As for those of you who like Starbucks or Tim Hortons, look closely at the stuff they're selling for take-home. You'll see shiny bits among the ground coffee. Those coffees are highly adulterated with the aim of addicting to their taste. 'Nuff said.
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#6484 - 12/08/09 03:29 AM Re: Here's Mud in Your Cup [Re: grelber]
artie505 Online


Registered: 08/04/09
Since you've brought up the subject of caffeine, I'll mention that I get mine from Pepsi, which is the first liquid down my throat virtually every day...close to 2 liters/day these days, but 24 cans/day at one point in my life.

I'm addicted to Pepsi's texture, its acidity/bite, not its caffeine; I can make do without it, when necessary, with no cravings or other ill-effects, but no beverage is as satisfying to me as is Pepsi. (Nope... It hasn't rotted either my teeth or stomach.)

I tasted iced coffee 2 or 3 times, 50-55 years ago, but hot coffee has never passed my lips; coffee flavored CHARMS, on the other hand, were great. (I don't recall ever trying tea, hot or iced.)
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#6485 - 12/08/09 04:14 AM Re: Here's Mud in Your Cup [Re: ryck]
dkmarsh Online
Moderator

Registered: 08/04/09

Nice thread.

We alternate between Trader Joe's two Ultra Dark roasts—Dark Sumatra and French Roast—with an occasional change-up to something a little lighter, like their Café Pajaro (still classified as a very dark roast, but to my palate, a bit less "bold" than the Ultra Darks). At under seven bucks a pound, they're by far the best coffee value I've ever turned up. (Actually, Eight O'Clock French Roast is a great value, too, but the TJ's Ultra Darks are so smooth that my palate has been ruined for the much coarser Eight O'Clock.)

We grind what we need and keep the can out of the fridge; I used to use the freezer, but upon reading somewhere (I'll see if I can dig up a source) that airtight, not cold, is the important state for preserving freshness, I stopped doing so years ago and haven't noticed any falloff in quality.

Like Grelber, I'll sometimes mix in some decaf (Trader Joe's French or Italian Roast) to cut the caffeine; on other occasions, I'll make decaf and "spice it up" with a few caffeinated beans. I don't usually drink coffee the moment I'm out of bed in the morning, and although a caffeine-free half year back in the murky past taught me the disingenuousness of claiming "oh, caffeine doesn't have much effect on me," I persist in my belief that the flavor is as much a trigger of the wakeup effect of coffee as the caffeine. Of course, that may be because I tend to drink small amounts throughout the day rather than big gulps in the morning.

We filter our drinking water, and that's what we use to brew coffee (that's what I use for baking, too, but for reasons of chemistry more than of flavor).

Like Jon, we use a defunct 4-cup drip coffeemaker, in our case, a Gevalia promotion made by Melitta. Rather than a Mr. Coffee-style basket filter, it employs a Melitta cone filter (unbleached no. 2). It's still going strong about a decade into its lifespan.

I'm not sure I agree with Jon's evaluation of the popularity of dark roasts in the East. Plenty of folks I know like a good dark roast. (Maybe it's a generational thing? I'm sure at least part of the appeal of Starbucks lies in the fact that they've always got a "bold" coffee available.)

None of you guys mentioned how you take your coffee. Black is the only way to drink it, as far as I'm concerned. My wife likes hers with turbinado sugar and milk (or cream, when we happen to have it on hand.)

Coffee and Caffeine's Frequently Asked Questions is an old but good source for a variety of relevant factoids.
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#6486 - 12/08/09 04:42 AM Re: Here's Mud in Your Cup [Re: jchuzi]
dboh Offline


Registered: 08/04/09
Quote:
We really like the coffee from Oren's Daily Roast and buy it regularly in the bean. Our experience shows that there are several factors to getting a good cup:


Thanks for sparking that memory! I lived a couple of blocks away from the Oren's on First Ave. (NYC) in the '80s. I believe I tried most, if not all, of their coffees. Even the decafs were good. Their take-out coffee was excellent. Now, I usually get something flavored (like Cinnamon Dolce Latte) from Starbucks as a treat, but your post reminds me that I'd forgotten how coffee really ought to taste.

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#6488 - 12/08/09 05:27 AM Re: Here's Mud in Your Cup [Re: dkmarsh]
jchuzi Online


Registered: 08/04/09
Loc: New York State
Originally Posted By: dkmarsh
Like Jon, we use a defunct 4-cup drip coffeemaker, in our case, a Gevalia promotion made by Melitta. Rather than a Mr. Coffee-style basket filter, it employs a Melitta cone filter (unbleached no. 2). It's still going strong about a decade into its lifespan.
We used one of those Gevalia promotions for many years and I was happy with it but noticed a HUGE difference after switching to the KitchenAid. It probably involves brewing at closer to the ideal temperature (195-203 F.). My wife wasn't satisfied, however, because she always claimed that buying a cup at Oren's tasted better than anything we made at home. She changed her mind after we got the KitchenAid. I think that the Melitta (from Gevalia) brews at a lower temperature because I seem to notice that it's cooler when I take the first sip. The Technivorm's claim to fame is that it brews at the ideal temperature. In addition, its heating element surrounds the reservoir but never comes in contact with water. To my taste, Gevalia coffee is unsatisfying.

Our tap water tastes good but is very corrosive. We use Poland Spring water for making coffee for that reason, and also because we don't have to de-scale the maker as often. Here's another tip: De-scale the maker occasionally. I do it by making a full pot consisting of 1/4 vinegar and the rest water. I run the maker through a cycle and then repeat with plain water 4 times to flush out all the vinegar. I do this whenever the taste of coffee noticeably deteriorates (roughly once a month). I clean the grinder at the same time and the Maestro Plus is very easy to clean.

Originally Posted By: dkmarsh
None of you guys mentioned how you take your coffee. Black is the only way to drink it, as far as I'm concerned.
I totally agree. Both my wife and I take it black.

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OS 10.14.2, iMac Retina 5K 27-inch, late 2014, 3.5 GHz Intel Core i5, 1 TB fusion drive, 16 GB RAM, Epson SureColor P600, Photoshop CC, Lightroom CC, MS Office 365

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#6489 - 12/08/09 05:48 AM Re: Here's Mud in Your Cup [Re: jchuzi]
grelber Offline


Registered: 08/05/09
Loc: North of 49th ||
Black, it is.
I used to start the day with a full espresso* café au lait, but now it's only a tablespoon of 35% cream in my first cup.
(* made in an Italian cafetière – Moka Express from A. Bialetti Crusinallo)

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#6496 - 12/08/09 09:39 AM Re: Here's Mud in Your Cup [Re: grelber]
joemikeb Online
Moderator

Registered: 08/04/09
Loc: Fort Worth, Texas
I first started on coffee around the age of 9 or 10 when I would go for a 5:00 AM breakfast at Archer City Cafe with my rancher grandfather after we had already spent at least three hours laying eyes on each and every head of cattle he owned. Since that time I have never dared drink my coffee any way but black lest he return from the grave to haunt me. The Archer Cafe served "cowboy coffee'. (The coffee is ready to drink when it was strong enough to float a horseshoe.) Later on that turned into Navy coffee (I had been on board ship for three months before I discovered that coffee cup was not permanently grafted onto the Chief Petty Officers' arm along with the stripes.) The best coffee was always in the Chief's mess and much better than we were served in the Wardroom.

Today I confess to being a Starbucks addict to the point I bought stock in the company. (Hopefully my investment will recoup part of what I spend there.) Personally I like my coffee the way I like my scotch — single bean and single malt. In other words no blends. My preferred coffees are of African origin and in general Ethiopian Sidamo beans. I find the flavored coffees worse than the insipid brown dishwater served as coffee in most establishments.

At home I have a Jura-Capresso coffee maker. It grinds the beans, tamps the grounds, then pumps hot water through them one cup at a time and will produce a cup ranging from one to eight ounces. On demand, it also steams and froths the milk for cappuccino. Speaking of demand, the coffee maker demands proper care and when it is turned on it will not make coffee until it has been rinsed out. Every 200 cups it shuts down until I run a complete cleaning cycle that flushes everything out including the cup the used grounds are dumped into. Sometimes it is like having a stern Germanic "barista" in the house, but it does make a good cup of coffee and each cup is guaranteed fresh.
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#6499 - 12/08/09 10:11 AM Re: Here's Mud in Your Cup [Re: joemikeb]
MacManiac Offline
Moderator

Registered: 08/04/09
Loc: Paradise....on the central Ore...
Why does it not surprise me that you've spent time in the CPO mess? I learned how to run a grill and make many specialty breakfast menus while mess-cranking in the CPO mess on my first deployment as a young sailor.....we won't go into the specifics of "SOS" or "Creamed _____-skins on Toast" in the mixed company of this venue. Let me just add that I still use the little secrets garnered from my 60 day exposure to the wisdom of a MasterChief Steward in my daily cooking habits to this day.

Oh yeah, coffee......

We buy ours dark roasted (nominally French Roast) in two pound whole-bean bags from a local roaster....keep it sealed and frozen until ready to prep....pull out only what's needed for a single pot of coffee, then nuke the beans for just over 30 seconds to bring out the oils and grind/brew it in our Cuisanart grind & brew drip maker using filtered water.......black and fresh is the only way to consume it.....can't drink the swill they call coffee at most restaurants without cutting it with cream.
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#6503 - 12/08/09 11:57 AM Re: Here's Mud in Your Cup [Re: MacManiac]
joemikeb Online
Moderator

Registered: 08/04/09
Loc: Fort Worth, Texas
Quote:
Let me just add that I still use the little secrets garnered from my 60 day exposure to the wisdom of a MasterChief Steward in my daily cooking habits to this day.

Some of the finest food I have ever eaten was in the mess hall at Camp Pendleton, California when I was stationed there as a liaison to the First Marine Division. It was prepared by a Navy trained Chief Master Sergeant and it was incredibly good. He fed the troops like kings! His cooking was so good the commanding general had to issue an order preventing the officers from eating in that mess hall because the competition from the mess hall food was threatening to bankrupt the Officer's Club.
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#6520 - 12/08/09 11:39 PM Re: Here's Mud in Your Cup [Re: jchuzi]
Phos.... Offline


Registered: 09/29/09
Loc: Lancaster PA
Originally Posted By: jchuzi
...If you drink commercial stuff (Maxwell House, Yuban, etc.), you'll get coffee that is mostly Coffea robusta. Robusta is high in caffeine but low in taste. The best coffee is Coffea arabica...


Didn't I see a show about coffee on the History Channel where they talked about the Maxwell House Hotel in Nashville becoming famous for their coffee because they were one of the first to zero in on the use of c. arabica as being the better tasting species?

Whether I remember that correctly or not, I do know that the Maxwell House coffee I buy for every day consumption states right on the label that it's 100% Arabica.

I also remember seeing the results of a blind taste test conducted with a pretty large sampling of people who claimed to be good coffee hounds, and that many of them picked a fresh cuppa plain from McDonald's as being their favorite. The Dunkin Donuts blend my Dad used to brew up when they first started selling it used to be pretty good too. I haven't gotten any for a long time, and I just haven't had occasion to go into one of their stores in years.
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#6523 - 12/09/09 03:36 AM Re: Here's Mud in Your Cup [Re: Phos....]
jchuzi Online


Registered: 08/04/09
Loc: New York State
Since coffee-consciousness has been raised in the US, my guess is that more commercial providers are using arabica. Despite my dislike for the current incarnation of Starbucks, that company probably did more to raise the coffee consciousness of people in the US than any other concern. I remember that the original Starbucks coffee was fairly decent but I think that they have gone downhill. Eight O'Clock coffee has a good reputation also.

Still, I find it next to impossible to get a decent cup in a US restaurant. That's not true in Canada nor in any European country that I have visited.
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OS 10.14.2, iMac Retina 5K 27-inch, late 2014, 3.5 GHz Intel Core i5, 1 TB fusion drive, 16 GB RAM, Epson SureColor P600, Photoshop CC, Lightroom CC, MS Office 365

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#6524 - 12/09/09 03:57 AM Re: Here's Mud in Your Cup [Re: jchuzi]
artie505 Online


Registered: 08/04/09
> I find it next to impossible to get a decent cup in a US restaurant.

A few years ago my local coffee shop owner got an offer he couldn't refuse and closed in short order, but before the end he offered me his coffee urn, one of those incredible, old, beautiful, glass-lined, triple tower things, at a very nominal price.

I pitched the thing to every restaurant owner I know, more than a few, (without trying to clean up) and was turned down by every one of them.

My understanding has always been that glass makes for better coffee than does stainless steel, and beyond that, you'd think that somebody would have wanted the thing for its aesthetics alone, but nope.

Go figure. confused
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#6527 - 12/09/09 06:40 AM Re: Here's Mud in Your Cup [Re: artie505]
roger Offline


Registered: 08/04/09
Loc: Vermont
I get Eight O'Clock whole beans, grind a bunch, and then I make enough for two days drinking. on the second day I microwave it, add a little half & half, and I'm good to go. I have a simple Black and Decker which I like since it will start on its own at 5am, so on the brew days the coffee's ready when I get up at 5:15am.

the rest of my caffeine needs are met with Mt Dew. (hi, artie!!)

I enjoy a good cup of coffee from my local coffee shop, but I don't feel a need for coffee snobbery any more than I do for beer snobbery. gimme a Rolling Rock and I'm happy. cool

though I have recently discovered Dr. McGillicudy's Black Licorice Schnapps. yum.
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#6528 - 12/09/09 09:32 AM Re: Here's Mud in Your Cup [Re: ryck]
ryck Offline


Registered: 08/04/09
Loc: Okanagan Valley
What a great place this lounge is to pose any kind of question.

Originally Posted By: jchuzi
1. Start with quality coffee. If you drink commercial stuff (Maxwell House, Yuban, etc.), you'll get coffee that is mostly Coffea robusta.........The best coffee is Coffea arabica,

The skill of the roaster is also critical.

Since your cup is mostly water, the quality of your water is critical.

We buy whole beans and freeze them, then grind only the amount that we need to make a pot. .......The consistency of the grind is crucial.

We prefer the drip method and use, of all things, a now-defunct KitchenAid 4-cup maker


I'm currently using Maxwell House, which says Coffee Arabica on the label, but I wonder if their roast is the issue. I find it a bit 'edgy' whereas I like a coffee that's more 'mellow', so I am looking for something else.

The water tip is interesting. Our tap water is quite good and very soft (I use much less shampoo than I did in any other city we've lived in - although I suppose there's an argument about having less to shampoo). The new coffee maker (Cuisinart Brew Central) uses water filters.

I've never ground my own beans although it's something I'm starting to think about. The idea sure has a lot of support from the folks in this thread.

Although my coffee maker can make 12 cups (needed for company) I seldom make more than four. Interestingly, the Cuisinart has a 1-4 cup water-heating function that double heats the water for four cups.

Originally Posted By: alternaut
Whatever you use, only drink freshly made coffee. If you absolutely have to keep it around, do so at exactly 83°C (181°F) for no longer than about half an hour, unless you want your taste buds to secede. smirk


Interesting. Tim Horton's has a freshness policy where any pot, no matter how full, is dumped and remade every half hour. And, my new coffeemaker has H-M-L plate temperature settings - although it doesn't say what the temperatures are.

Originally Posted By: grelber
Given the amount of coffee I drink, I developed a caffeine addiction which resulted in migraine-like headaches if I went over 12 hours without caffeinated coffee. Bummer. So I've had to shift to my preferences.

As for those of you who like Starbucks or Tim Hortons, look closely at the stuff they're selling for take-home. You'll see shiny bits among the ground coffee.


You can develop the addiction even with a lower intake. Years ago my wife, who never drank more than a few cups a day, stopped drinking coffee. About a week later I was reading an article about coffee addiction (thinking of myself, who was consuming about 18 cups per day) and I gave the article to her.

About ten minutes later she came back into the living room, eyes open to about f1.4, and said that she had experienced every one of the withdrawal symptoms.

What would the 'shiny bits' be?

Originally Posted By: artie505
Since you've brought up the subject of caffeine, I'll mention that I get mine from Pepsi, which is the first liquid down my throat virtually every day...close to 2 liters/day these days, but 24 cans/day at one point in my life.


Diet or Regular? If it's regular I hope you're keeping an eye on your blood sugar level - Stage 2 diabetes is such a worry these days. Sorry about the health nag but it is a prod accompanied with kind intent.

Originally Posted By: dkmarsh
I used to use the freezer, but upon reading somewhere.......that airtight, not cold, is the important state for preserving freshness, I stopped doing so years ago and haven't noticed any falloff in quality.

Like Grelber, I'll sometimes mix in some decaf (Trader Joe's French or Italian Roast) to cut the caffeine; on other occasions, I'll make decaf and "spice it up" with a few caffeinated beans.


I hope that's true. When our deep freeze gave up the ghost we didn't bother replacing it (once the kids are gone, who needs it?) and just use the refrigerator freezers, which means that frozen real estate is at a premium.

It's looking like experimentation is a good idea. I've read that some people use chicory to reduce caffeine while maintaining a good coffee taste. If so, it's also something that would be pretty easy to grow.

Originally Posted By: joemikeb
The Archer Cafe served "cowboy coffee'. (The coffee is ready to drink when it was strong enough to float a horseshoe.)


It sounds like the coffee my Mother made except that her criterion was whether a spoon could remain vertical in it, which probably accounts for why I didn't start drinking coffee until I left home and had a less intimidating brew, "Oh....that's how it's supposed to taste!"

Originally Posted By: MacManiac
....pull out only what's needed for a single pot of coffee, then nuke the beans for just over 30 seconds to bring out the oils


Another good experimentation idea. Thanks.


Edited by ryck (12/09/09 09:40 AM)
Edit Reason: Grammar
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ryck

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#6531 - 12/09/09 12:01 PM Re: Here's Mud in Your Cup [Re: ryck]
grelber Offline


Registered: 08/05/09
Loc: North of 49th ||
From Drug Digest:
Coffee, Exercise Fight Prostate Cancer

If you're not signed up for (free) access, you'll have to do so. It's worth it.

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#6535 - 12/09/09 12:56 PM Re: Here's Mud in Your Cup [Re: ryck]
Hal Itosis Offline


Registered: 09/03/09
Loc: 10.6.8 (build 10K549)
Code:
Caffeine -- food of the gods.


            CH3                               H   H
             |                                 \ /
             |                           O      C---H
             N                           \\    /
            / \                   H       C---N
       N---C   C===O               \     /     \
       ||  ||  |                H---C---N       C===O
       ||  ||  |                   /     \     /
       C   C   N---CH3            H       C===C       H
      / \ / \ /                           |    \     /
     H   N   C                            |     N---C---H
         |   ||                           |    /     \
         |   ||                           N===C       H
        CH3  O                                 \
                                                H
                       (
                         )     (
                  ___...(-------)-....___
              .-""       )    (          ""-.
              |-._             )         _.-|`''`-.
              |   `""-=*%$@@@@@@@$%*=-"""'  |.--.  \
              |   ___                       |    \  \
              |  / __|     __  __     ___   |    |  |
              | | (__ ___ / _|/ _|___/ -_)  |   /  /
              |  \___/ _ \  _|  _/ -_)___|  | /' /'
              |      \___/_| |_| \___|      |' /'
              \                             /\ \_
               \      makes the world      /  \__)
       _..---""'\        go 'round        /`""---.._
    .-'          \                       /          '-.
   :              `-.__             __.-'              :
   :                 ) ""---...---"" (                 :
    `._              `"--...___...--"`              _.'
      \""--..__                             __..--""/
       `._     """---.....______.....----"""     _.'
          `""--..,,____            _____,,..--""'
                       `"""----"""'


                            CAPU
                ____   _   _   _   _   ___
               |       |___|   |\  |  |   |
               |____   |   |   | \_|  |___|
                     8      10      4      2

smile (i collected a lot of ascii art back in the day)

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#6536 - 12/09/09 01:15 PM Re: Here's Mud in Your Cup [Re: Hal Itosis]
jchuzi Online


Registered: 08/04/09
Loc: New York State
Nice art work, Hal, but theobromine, one of the components of chocolate, is actually Food Of The Gods.

Chocolate is the answer. Who cares what the question is? grin
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Jon

OS 10.14.2, iMac Retina 5K 27-inch, late 2014, 3.5 GHz Intel Core i5, 1 TB fusion drive, 16 GB RAM, Epson SureColor P600, Photoshop CC, Lightroom CC, MS Office 365

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#6538 - 12/09/09 01:32 PM Re: Here's Mud in Your Cup [Re: jchuzi]
Hal Itosis Offline


Registered: 09/03/09
Loc: 10.6.8 (build 10K549)
Originally Posted By: jchuzi
Nice art work, Hal, but theobromine, one of the components of chocolate, is actually Food Of The Gods.

D R O O L.
[me want]

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#6546 - 12/09/09 04:08 PM Re: Here's Mud in Your Cup [Re: Hal Itosis]
kiwichris Offline


Registered: 08/05/09
Loc: New Zealand
I gotta admit, when it comes to coffee I am a real peasant. Dark, strong instant, the cheapest does just fine thanks smile Large mug, milky, 2 sugars thanks and I am very happy. I have yet to come across a brewed coffee that I like, but then I live in NZ, perhaps the real good stuff doesn't get here grin

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#6548 - 12/09/09 05:48 PM Re: Here's Mud in Your Cup [Re: ryck]
artie505 Online


Registered: 08/04/09
Quote:
Artie: Since you've brought up the subject of caffeine, I'll mention that I get mine from Pepsi, which is the first liquid down my throat virtually every day...close to 2 liters/day these days, but 24 cans/day at one point in my life.

Quote:
ryck: Diet or Regular? If it's regular I hope you're keeping an eye on your blood sugar level - Stage 2 diabetes is such a worry these days. Sorry about the health nag but it is a prod accompanied with kind intent.

Your concern is appreciated, but nope...no issues that I either see or feel, doctors being excluded from the equation.. (I did the math once during my case/day phase, and it came out to 700+ pounds of sugar/year.)
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#6549 - 12/09/09 05:50 PM Re: Here's Mud in Your Cup [Re: jchuzi]
artie505 Online


Registered: 08/04/09
> Chocolate is the answer. Who cares what the question is?

One of the best T-shirts I ever saw read "I want it all, but I'll settle for chocolate!"
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The new Great Equalizer is the SEND button.

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#6550 - 12/09/09 05:53 PM Re: Here's Mud in Your Cup [Re: roger]
artie505 Online


Registered: 08/04/09
> the rest of my caffeine needs are met with Mt Dew. (hi, artie!!)

Yay, roger; I couldn't imagine myself being the only soda provided caffeine junkie around here.
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The new Great Equalizer is the SEND button.

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