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#52877 - 11/14/19 11:43 PM iPhone question
artie505 Online


Registered: 08/04/09
I'm trying to determine whether an iPhone 5s is compatible with GSM, CDMA, both, or are there options for all of the above?

I know that an iPhone 6 is both GSM and CDMA compatible, but I'm seeing conflicting info about the 5s, and to my eyes, Mactracker is ambiguous, as is Apple's specs page.

Thanks.
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#52879 - 11/15/19 11:49 AM Re: iPhone question [Re: artie505]
joemikeb Offline
Moderator

Registered: 08/04/09
Loc: Fort Worth, Texas
The iOS version of MacTracker lists four iPhone 5 versions
  1. iPhone 5 (GSM North America) Model identifier 5,1 Model number 1428
  2. iPhone 5. (GSM International) Model identifier 5,1 Model number 1429
  3. iPhone 5 (GSM and CDMA) Model number 5,2 Model number 1429
  4. iPhone 5 (China) Model Identifier 5,2 Model Number 1442
So GSM ONLY models will have the 5,1 Model identifier while GSM/CDMA models will have the Model Identifier 5,2.

IIRC in iOS 12 and earlier the Model identifier is shown in Settings > General > About but in iOS 13 just the model name is listed so determining the Model Identifier may be difficult.
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#52895 - 11/16/19 06:36 PM Re: iPhone question [Re: joemikeb]
artie505 Online


Registered: 08/04/09
Thanks for that, but you misread my post which asked about the iPhone 5s.

The 5s has only one Mactracker entry, and it's hardly the most reader-friendly piece of text I've ever seen...reminds me of a world-championship word-search puzzle:

Originally Posted By: Mactracker
Networks A1533 (GSM): UMTS/HSPA+/DC-HSDPA (850, 900, 1700/2100, 1900, 2100 MHz); GSM/EDGE (850, 900, 1800, 1900 MHz); LTE (Bands 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 8, 13, 17, 19, 20, 25) A1533 (CDMA): CDMA EV-DO Rev. A and Rev. B (800, 1700/2100, 1900, 2100 MHz); UMTS/HSPA+/DC-HSDPA (850, 900, 1700/2100, 1900, 2100 MHz); GSM/EDGE (850, 900, 1800, 1900 MHz); LTE (Bands 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 8, 13, 17, 19, 20, 25) A1453: CDMA EV-DO Rev. A and Rev. B (800, 1700/2100, 1900, 2100 MHz); UMTS/HSPA+/DC-HSDPA (850, 900, 1700/2100, 1900, 2100 MHz); GSM/EDGE (850, 900, 1800, 1900 MHz); LTE (Bands 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 8, 13, 17, 18, 19, 20, 25, 26) A1457: UMTS/HSPA+/DC-HSDPA (850, 900, 1900, 2100 MHz); GSM/EDGE (850, 900, 1800, 1900 MHz); LTE (Bands 1, 2, 3, 5, 7, 8, 20) A1528: UMTS/HSPA+/DC-HSDPA (850, 900, 1900, 2100 MHz);GSM/EDGE (850, 900, 1800, 1900 MHz) A1530: UMTS/HSPA+/DC-HSDPA (850, 900, 1900, 2100 MHz); GSM/EDGE (850, 900, 1800, 1900 MHz); FDD-LTE (Bands 1, 2, 3, 5, 7, 8, 20); TD-LTE (Bands 38, 39, 40) A1518: GSM/EDGE (850, 900, 1800, 1900 MHz);TD-SCDMA 1900 (F), 2000 (A);TD-LTE (38, 39, 40);UMTS (WCDMA)/HSPA+/DC-HSDPA (850, 900, 1900, 2100 MHz)


Apple has been a bit more considerate:

Cellular and Wireless
Model A1533 (GSM)*: UMTS/HSPA+/DC-HSDPA (850, 900, 1700/2100, 1900, 2100 MHz); GSM/EDGE (850, 900, 1800, 1900 MHz); LTE (Bands 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 8, 13, 17, 19, 20, 25)
Model A1533 (CDMA)*: CDMA EV-DO Rev. A and Rev. B (800, 1700/2100, 1900, 2100 MHz); UMTS/HSPA+/DC-HSDPA (850, 900, 1700/2100, 1900, 2100 MHz); GSM/EDGE (850, 900, 1800, 1900 MHz); LTE (Bands 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 8, 13, 17, 19, 20, 25)
Model A1453*: CDMA EV-DO Rev. A and Rev. B (800, 1700/2100, 1900, 2100 MHz); UMTS/HSPA+/DC-HSDPA (850, 900, 1700/2100, 1900, 2100 MHz); GSM/EDGE (850, 900, 1800, 1900 MHz); LTE (Bands 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 8, 13, 17, 18, 19, 20, 25, 26)
Model A1457*: UMTS/HSPA+/DC-HSDPA (850, 900, 1900, 2100 MHz); GSM/EDGE (850, 900, 1800, 1900 MHz); LTE (Bands 1, 2, 3, 5, 7, 8, 20)
Model A1530*: UMTS/HSPA+/DC-HSDPA (850, 900, 1900, 2100 MHz); GSM/EDGE (850, 900, 1800, 1900 MHz); FDD-LTE (Bands 1, 2, 3, 5, 7, 8, 20); TD-LTE (Bands 38, 39, 40)
802.11a/b/g/n Wi-Fi (802.11n 2.4GHz and 5GHz)
Bluetooth 4.0 wireless technology


But I finally found some clarity:

Model A1453: This model works on CDMA EV-DO Rev. A and Rev. B system (with 800, 1700/2100, 1900, 2100 MHz bands), it supports 13 LTE bands (Bands 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 8, 13, 17, 18, 19, 20, 25, 26); UMTS/HSPA+/DC-HSDPA (850, 900, 1700/2100, 1900, 2100 MHz) and GSM/EDGE (850, 900, 1800, 1900 MHz). This is the most universal model as it could work on major LTE networks in the U.S., however, it is sold locked on Sprint.
Model A1533 (GSM): This is the GSM version of model A1533 which is being sold locked and unlocked for AT&T and T-Mobile. This is also the SIM-free international version of iPhone 5S, which doesn’t include a nano-SIM card. It supports 11 LTE bands LTE (Bands 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 8, 13, 17, 19, 20, 25), UMTS/HSPA+/DC-HSDPA (850, 900, 1700/2100, 1900, 2100 MHz) and GSM/EDGE (850, 900, 1800, 1900 MHz).
Model A1533 (CDMA): This is the CDMA version of A1533. It works on CDMA EV-DO Rev. A and Rev. B (800, 1700/2100, 1900, 2100 MHz) and is being sold for Verizon’s customers. It supports 11 LTE Bands (Bands 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 8, 13, 17, 19, 20, 25), UMTS/HSPA+/DC-HSDPA (850, 900, 1700/2100, 1900, 2100 MHz) and GSM/EDGE (850, 900, 1800, 1900 MHz).
Model A1457: This is the model for European markets. It supports 7 LTE bands (Bands 1, 2, 3, 5, 7, 8, 20) which can work on EE, Vodafone and O2 in the U.K., it also supports UMTS/HSPA+/DC-HSDPA (850, 900, 1900, 2100 MHz) and GSM/EDGE (850, 900, 1800, 1900 MHz).
Model A1530: The model is tailored for Asian markets. It supports the 3 TD-LTE bands 38, 39, 40 and 7 FDD-LTE bands 1, 2, 3, 5, 7, 8, 20, therefore, it can work well on TD-LTE network of China Mobile, the largest mobile operator in the world. It also supports UMTS/HSPA+/DC-HSDPA (850, 900, 1900, 2100 MHz) and GSM/EDGE (850, 900, 1800, 1900 MHz).
Model A1528: This is the unlocked model being sold in China. It is just like the simplified GSM version of A1530 as it doesn’t have LTE bands. It only supports UMTS/HSPA+/DC-HSDPA (850, 900, 1900, 2100 MHz) and GSM/EDGE (850, 900, 1800, 1900 MHz).

And from reading eBay listings I've picked up this additional info:
  1. The 1453 "is compatible with Virgin Mobile, Boost Mobile, Sprint Carriers."
  2. The 1533 (CDMA) "is compatible with Straight Talk, U.S. Cellular, TracFone, Verizon, Xfinity Carriers."
  3. The 1533 (GSM) "is compatible with metroPCS, AT&T, Cricket, T-Mobile Carriers."
And in closing, although there are
Quote:
"Model Number: A1533 (CDMA + GSM)
Network: Unlocked"
listings on eBay, there is no such phone .

Considerable diligence is most assuredly a necessity when researching iPhone 5s offerings on eBay.
_________________________
The new Great Equalizer is the SEND button.

In Memory Of Harv: Those who can make you believe absurdities can make you commit atrocities. ~Voltaire

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#52899 - 11/17/19 01:23 PM Re: iPhone question [Re: artie505]
joemikeb Offline
Moderator

Registered: 08/04/09
Loc: Fort Worth, Texas
CLARIFICATION PLEASE: In your other thread I thought you indicated you did not intend to use the device as a telephone so cellular network connectivity would be a useless continuing expense. If that is the case why would you care if it is GSM or GSM/CDMA and what Cellular network it is compatible with? What Am I Missing?

BACK TO THE TOPIC OF THIS THREAD and again referring to the iOS version of MacTracker this is the single listing for the iPhone 5s, which clearly indicates model identifier iPhone6,1 is GSM only and iPhone6,2 is both GSM and CDMA.

I just took a cursory look at Ebay listings and although many indicate whether they are GSM or GSM/CDMA in the listing header, I didn't find any that listed the Apple model identifier so while the model identifier is definitive it does not appear to be particularly helpful frown

As to the network details the cellular providers provide enough frequency and band overlap so there is little reason for users to concern themselves about that. If the phone is locked to a particular carrier there are known ways to unlock them — in some cases this has bricked the iPhone. Personally I would choose the carrier first and then look for a compatible device.
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#52909 - 11/18/19 03:10 AM Re: iPhone question [Re: joemikeb]
artie505 Online


Registered: 08/04/09
Originally Posted By: joemikeb
CLARIFICATION PLEASE: In your other thread I thought you indicated you did not intend to use the device as a telephone so cellular network connectivity would be a useless continuing expense. If that is the case why would you care if it is GSM or GSM/CDMA and what Cellular network it is compatible with? What Am I Missing?

You're not missing anything; I jumped from "A" to "C" without realizing that there was a need to clarify "B."

As I got into considering which iPhone to buy I realized that since I was actually buying this one (as opposed to getting it as a hand-me-down) it would be in my best interests to buy one that I could actually use as a phone should I ever need one...IF I could get one at a not unreasonable price.

Results of my research: Regardless of cost, any iPhone earlier than a 5s would be wasted money, because it would be 3G (not to mention 32 bit) and would cease functioning as a phone in the near future, so the 5s I ended up buying, which is still supported, 4G, 64 bit, and (using my criteria) at $105 didn't cost a heck of a lot more than a 5 at $90 would have cost (An iPhone 4 or 4s is a ridiculously expensive "collector's item.") was a ridiculously easy choice. I considered an SE, but it would have cost me $50 more for, basically, a 12 MP camera (as opposed to the 8 in a 5s), which would have been overkill.

Originally Posted By: joemikeb
BACK TO THE TOPIC OF THIS THREAD and again referring to the iOS version of MacTracker this is the single listing for the iPhone 5s, which clearly indicates model identifier iPhone6,1 is GSM only and iPhone6,2 is both GSM and CDMA.

Yes and - I THINK - no: my research indicated that Apple really was obscure about the 5s...that there are two different iPhone6,2s, one GSM, and the other CDMA, and both are identified as Model A 1533, as told in Differences between iPhone 5S A1533, A1453, A1457 and A1530 (linked in my earlier post).

In support of that, the one I bought was listed as "A1533 ME341LL/A," and iPhone 5s (CDMA/Verizon/A153...one6,1) tells
Quote:
Please note that this "CDMA" A1533 iPhone 5s model -- which is compatible with LTE bands 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 8, 13, 17, 19, 20, and 25 (as well as both CDMA EV-DO and GSM connectivity) -- is intended for Verizon in the US.

Originally Posted By: joemikeb
I just took a cursory look at Ebay listings and although many indicate whether they are GSM or GSM/CDMA in the listing header, I didn't find any that listed the Apple model identifier so while the model identifier is definitive it does not appear to be particularly helpful frown

Yeah, lack of numbers other than "Model Number A 1453 & 1533" (in the case of the 5s) makes it really difficult to distinguish between offerings; the one I bought was an extremely rare instance of full documentation.

Originally Posted By: joemikeb
Personally I would choose the carrier first and then look for a compatible device.

And that's exactly what I did...bought a locked Verizon phone.
_________________________
The new Great Equalizer is the SEND button.

In Memory Of Harv: Those who can make you believe absurdities can make you commit atrocities. ~Voltaire

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#52911 - 11/18/19 09:19 AM Re: iPhone question [Re: artie505]
joemikeb Offline
Moderator

Registered: 08/04/09
Loc: Fort Worth, Texas
Glad you found what you were looking for. What is annoying to me about iPhone model identification is it sometimes hinges on the Model Identifier ([I]ie. iPhone6,1), sometimes on the Model Number, and sometimes on what telco is was made for.
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#52912 - 11/18/19 09:29 AM Re: iPhone question [Re: joemikeb]
artie505 Online


Registered: 08/04/09
Shopping for an iPhone can be an excruciatingly painful experience, and Apple's nomenclature has a lot to do with it; you've generally got to dig into the small print, and often have to do some searching to know what you're getting.

The other downside is that many of the people selling non-current iPhones use U.S. addresses but are actually based in China. They create an eBay identity, run up a nice positive rating selling something innocuous, and then start selling reworked iPhones as new, and for unrealistically low prices, and do nice business. I ran across one seller who was touting his own one year warrantee on a phone that is still supported, and, therefore, theoretically, anyhow, covered by Apple's warrantee.


Edited by artie505 (11/18/19 09:52 AM)
Edit Reason: Expand
_________________________
The new Great Equalizer is the SEND button.

In Memory Of Harv: Those who can make you believe absurdities can make you commit atrocities. ~Voltaire

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#52915 - 11/18/19 10:04 AM Re: iPhone question [Re: artie505]
joemikeb Offline
Moderator

Registered: 08/04/09
Loc: Fort Worth, Texas
Originally Posted By: artie505
The other downside is that many of the people selling non-current iPhones use U.S. addresses but are actually based in China. They create an eBay identity, run up a nice positive rating selling something innocuous, and then start selling reworked iPhones as new, and for unrealistically low prices, and do nice business. I ran across one seller who was touting his own one year warrantee on a phone that is still supported, and, therefore, theoretically, anyhow, covered by Apple's warrantee.

Many of those same people also sell through Amazon as well, but at least with Amazon returns are easy and refunds immediate (at least that has been my experience).
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#52916 - 11/18/19 10:14 AM Re: iPhone question [Re: joemikeb]
artie505 Online


Registered: 08/04/09
Originally Posted By: joemikeb
Originally Posted By: artie505
The other downside is that many of the people selling non-current iPhones use U.S. addresses but are actually based in China. They create an eBay identity, run up a nice positive rating selling something innocuous, and then start selling reworked iPhones as new, and for unrealistically low prices, and do nice business. I ran across one seller who was touting his own one year warrantee on a phone that is still supported, and, therefore, theoretically, anyhow, covered by Apple's warrantee.

Many of those same people also sell through Amazon as well, but at least with Amazon returns are easy and refunds immediate (at least that has been my experience).

Happily, I've not had to make much use of it, but I've had good luck with eBay, including their "eBay Money Back Guarantee."

I think, though, that Amazon's is a more user-friendly process, but it needs to be, because Amazon product descriptions are very often so lacking in (even important) detail that you don't know what you're getting until you've got it, which in and of itself is not at all user-friendly.
_________________________
The new Great Equalizer is the SEND button.

In Memory Of Harv: Those who can make you believe absurdities can make you commit atrocities. ~Voltaire

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#52951 - 11/22/19 11:33 PM Re: iPhone question [Re: artie505]
artie505 Online


Registered: 08/04/09
WOW!

Setting up this iPhone was the most incredibly complicated thing I've ever done.

I think I'm finally set, but I"ve got no idea what I don't know, so I can't be certain. crazy
_________________________
The new Great Equalizer is the SEND button.

In Memory Of Harv: Those who can make you believe absurdities can make you commit atrocities. ~Voltaire

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#52956 - 11/23/19 07:43 AM Re: iPhone question [Re: artie505]
joemikeb Offline
Moderator

Registered: 08/04/09
Loc: Fort Worth, Texas
Originally Posted By: artie505
Setting up this iPhone was the most incredibly complicated thing I've ever done.

Assuming you followed the on screen prompts in order and didn't skip anything you are unlikely to have missed anything critical and as in MacOS you can fine tune your choices as you go along. Remember that MacOS, iOS, iPadOS, WatchOS, and TVOS are all built on the same code base and while there are necessary differences they are more and more alike so much of what you know about MacOS is largely transferable to your "new" iPhone and vice-versa.

The setup process for a new iPhone has evolved over the years and over the various iOS upgrades and probably because I started in the beginning and have taken it in baby steps I haven't found it particularly challenging (that doesn't mean I haven't screwed up and had to start over — more than once). But my recent iPhone upgrade was unquestionably the quickest and easiest ever. Simply turn on the new phone and set it beside the old one and everything is automagically transferred and set up. The only manual intervention required was recording the security code and biometric identification data. After that all I had to do was remove the old phone from my Find list of devices, delete it from the list of devices on my Apple account, and Erase all the data and settings. The challenging part was being sure AT&T removed the old phone from my account, but having dealt with AT&T for many years, that was expected.
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#52993 - 11/27/19 12:44 AM Re: iPhone question [Re: joemikeb]
artie505 Online


Registered: 08/04/09
Originally Posted By: joemikeb
Originally Posted By: artie505
Setting up this iPhone was the most incredibly complicated thing I've ever done.

Assuming you followed the on screen prompts in order and didn't skip anything you are unlikely to have missed anything critical and as in MacOS you can fine tune your choices as you go along.

The problem for this NEW iPhone user was that after the initial setup there are myriad "Settings" - waaay more than there are System Prefs on a Mac - some of which I still don't understand, all of which needed to at least be considered, and compounding that is the fact that while clicking on my MBP is easy and sure, tapping on the iPhone is hit or miss...never a sure thing, and that's further compounded by the aggravation of multiple entries of my password which requires six keyboard shifts AND paying attention to hit the correct keys...including NOT hitting "Enter" when trying to hit "Delete." Aaaargh!!!

And after all that, I realized that I had unconsciously deleted the Messages app and had to do a factory reset and go through the whole procedure again to get it back. frown
_________________________
The new Great Equalizer is the SEND button.

In Memory Of Harv: Those who can make you believe absurdities can make you commit atrocities. ~Voltaire

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#52999 - 11/27/19 10:41 AM Re: iPhone question [Re: artie505]
joemikeb Offline
Moderator

Registered: 08/04/09
Loc: Fort Worth, Texas
I know what you men about the number of settings. That is aggravated by the fact that so many of the settings such as Location have both system wide and app-by-app settings. To top it all off some apps have in-app preference settings in addition to those in the Settings app.

Suggestion — had you performed a backup to iCloud or to iTunes before you erased your iPhone, most of those settings could have been recovered from the backup and would have saved a lot of time and aggravation. FWIW I prefer the iCloud backup because the only action required on my part is to put the iPhone on charge before I go to sleep each night which I do anyway.
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#53002 - 11/27/19 05:03 PM Re: iPhone question [Re: joemikeb]
artie505 Online


Registered: 08/04/09
I totally forgot about syncing before I reset ( blush ), but in retrospect, going back to square one wasn't a bad idea, because as opposed to the haphazard job I did with Settings the first time around, I did a thorough top to bottom job the second time.
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The new Great Equalizer is the SEND button.

In Memory Of Harv: Those who can make you believe absurdities can make you commit atrocities. ~Voltaire

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