An open community 
of Macintosh users,
for Macintosh users.

FineTunedMac Dashboard widget now available! Download Here

Previous Thread
Next Thread
Print Thread
Page 3 of 5 1 2 3 4 5
Re: Removing Cookies
Virtual1 #49273 06/30/18 05:33 AM
Joined: Aug 2009
Likes: 1
Online

Joined: Aug 2009
Likes: 1
Originally Posted By: Virtual1
and that's how you cross-nest tags. spin the wheel of fortune to guess how it's going to mark it up.

So the seemingly anomalous rendering is really unexpectedly expected. tongue

Thanks for the explanation.


The new Great Equalizer is the SEND button.

In Memory of Harv: Those who can make you believe absurdities can make you commit atrocities. ~Voltaire
Re: Removing Cookies
plantsower #49274 06/30/18 05:35 AM
Joined: Aug 2009
Likes: 1
Online

Joined: Aug 2009
Likes: 1
Originally Posted By: plantsower
So it's not me? Whew!

There was never any question of its having been you; the question has been "WHY?"


The new Great Equalizer is the SEND button.

In Memory of Harv: Those who can make you believe absurdities can make you commit atrocities. ~Voltaire
Re: Removing Cookies
artie505 #49279 06/30/18 03:47 PM
Joined: Sep 2009
OP Offline

Joined: Sep 2009
OK, then I feel better! This website is quirky in other ways too, at times.



Originally Posted By: artie505
Originally Posted By: plantsower
So it's not me? Whew!

There was never any question of its having been you; the question has been "WHY?"


MacBook Pro - Catalina 10.15.6
Safari 13.1.2
Music 1.0.6.10




iPhone 5s Version 9.3.2 iTunes 12.4.0.119
Re: Removing Cookies
plantsower #50208 10/13/18 10:11 PM
Joined: Sep 2009
OP Offline

Joined: Sep 2009
I called AppleCare today about the ever cookie, zombie cookies and now Fingerprinting way of scattering cookies all through our computers. The Tier 2 tech said that those cookies depend on Java and that even though I'm not using it, the sites I go to are using it. So, that's how they can get it into my Mac. That kind of made sense.

She also said that Mojave has blocked Java completely, even when one goes to another site, so she thinks that may take care of it.

What do you guys think? I've been avoiding upgrading to Mojave. What are the pros and cons of Mojava in your experience?

Thanks.


MacBook Pro - Catalina 10.15.6
Safari 13.1.2
Music 1.0.6.10




iPhone 5s Version 9.3.2 iTunes 12.4.0.119
Re: Removing Cookies
plantsower #50211 10/14/18 11:59 AM
Joined: Aug 2009
Likes: 2
Moderator
Online
Moderator

Joined: Aug 2009
Likes: 2
IMHO the only con is the same as any other MacOS upgrade, you will need to upgrade/update a lot of apps for full compatibility. As to the pros, security is tighter (which does mean an extra step or two when passwords are involved), it is stable, fast, and has a plethora of cool new features. D


joemikeb • moderator
Re: Removing Cookies
joemikeb #50215 10/14/18 05:12 PM
Joined: Sep 2009
OP Offline

Joined: Sep 2009
Sorry for the late answer. I had to try 3 browsers before I could get in! Thanks, Joemike for your input. Anyone else?


Originally Posted By: joemikeb
IMHO the only con is the same as any other MacOS upgrade, you will need to upgrade/update a lot of apps for full compatibility. As to the pros, security is tighter (which does mean an extra step or two when passwords are involved), it is stable, fast, and has a plethora of cool new features. D


MacBook Pro - Catalina 10.15.6
Safari 13.1.2
Music 1.0.6.10




iPhone 5s Version 9.3.2 iTunes 12.4.0.119
Re: Removing Cookies
plantsower #50221 10/15/18 04:25 PM
Joined: Aug 2009
Online

Joined: Aug 2009
I upgraded a late 2014 iMac 5K over the past weekend. Everything so far has gone quite smoothly.

As joemikeb mentioned, some apps will require additional security allowances. But I found that process to be very straightforward and many of the app developers provided instructions on what was required for their specific application.

My move was from MacOS 10.13.x. You may find a two level upgrade (i.e., from 10.12.x) a little bumpier, but you are not the only one to be making that jump. From what I have read, many people are saying this is one of the smoothest initial upgrades of any OS X.

Also, based on other comments in this forum, I am using Dark Mode and liking it.


On a Mac since 1984.
Currently: 27" iMacs, Macbook Air, macOS 10.15.x,; iPhones, iPods and iPads galore!
Re: Removing Cookies
Ira L #50222 10/15/18 04:43 PM
Joined: Sep 2009
OP Offline

Joined: Sep 2009
Ira: Would you explain what you mean by additional security allowances? I like the fact that I don't have to remember my passwords now. Would that still be the case?

Also, I just noticed that when I disable JavaScript, I cannot get into YouTube which I use a lot.

Rita





Originally Posted By: Ira L
I upgraded a late 2014 iMac 5K over the past weekend. Everything so far has gone quite smoothly.

As joemikeb mentioned, some apps will require additional security allowances. But I found that process to be very straightforward and many of the app developers provided instructions on what was required for their specific application.

My move was from MacOS 10.13.x. You may find a two level upgrade (i.e., from 10.12.x) a little bumpier, but you are not the only one to be making that jump. From what I have read, many people are saying this is one of the smoothest initial upgrades of any OS X.

Also, based on other comments in this forum, I am using Dark Mode and liking it.


MacBook Pro - Catalina 10.15.6
Safari 13.1.2
Music 1.0.6.10




iPhone 5s Version 9.3.2 iTunes 12.4.0.119
Re: Removing Cookies
plantsower #50223 10/15/18 06:23 PM
Joined: Aug 2009
Likes: 2
Moderator
Online
Moderator

Joined: Aug 2009
Likes: 2
Originally Posted By: plantsower
Would you explain what you mean by additional security allowances? I like the fact that I don't have to remember my passwords now. Would that still be the case?

Also, I just noticed that when I disable JavaScript, I cannot get into YouTube which I use a lot.

That question covers a lot of different areas and I don't remember them all but among the security changes are...
  • Requiring a user with admin privileges to go to System Preferences > Security & Privacy and specifically grant an app access to specific parts of the system. This is a one time step every time you install an app that requires access to parts of the system outside of the app's "sandbox".
  • with auto filed fields in Safari the user is required to enter their login password or fingerprint before allowing auto filling a field. That will happen every time that field is auto filled. (My wife just got a long email about that from our password manager 1Password justifying Apple's decision to do this.
  • This is independent of Apple but more and more critical sites are requiring "two-factor authentication."
As congress, and the administration are just now recognizing, the internet is a dangerous environment. Software companies are struggling not to keep up rather to not get any further behind. The same can be said of users and increased security will inevitably mean inconvenience. I have a couple of hundred passwords and far too many are either duplicated, way too old, or grossly out of date. So with the help of the aforementioned 1Password I am in the process of updating all my passwords to unique, current, and secure. I figure I will finish just in time to start the cycle all over again. 🤬

My suggestion is get a good password management system, there are several on the App Store, and use it diligently. Keychain is secure, bit it does not have the management features of 1Password and its kin,


joemikeb • moderator
Re: Removing Cookies
joemikeb #50224 10/15/18 06:30 PM
Joined: Sep 2009
OP Offline

Joined: Sep 2009
Thanks, JoeMike. I don't like keychain. I can't remember what happened but it caused me a problem so I quit using it. I thought about using a password app but I am paranoid about it getting hacked and then someone would have all my passwords conveniently in one location. Is that not an issue? Thanks.


Rita





Originally Posted By: joemikeb
Originally Posted By: plantsower
Would you explain what you mean by additional security allowances? I like the fact that I don't have to remember my passwords now. Would that still be the case?

Also, I just noticed that when I disable JavaScript, I cannot get into YouTube which I use a lot.

That question covers a lot of different areas and I don't remember them all but among the security changes are...
  • Requiring a user with admin privileges to go to System Preferences > Security & Privacy and specifically grant an app access to specific parts of the system. This is a one time step every time you install an app that requires access to parts of the system outside of the app's "sandbox".
  • with auto filed fields in Safari the user is required to enter their login password or fingerprint before allowing auto filling a field. That will happen every time that field is auto filled. (My wife just got a long email about that from our password manager 1Password justifying Apple's decision to do this.
  • This is independent of Apple but more and more critical sites are requiring "two-factor authentication."
As congress, and the administration are just now recognizing, the internet is a dangerous environment. Software companies are struggling not to keep up rather to not get any further behind. The same can be said of users and increased security will inevitably mean inconvenience. I have a couple of hundred passwords and far too many are either duplicated, way too old, or grossly out of date. So with the help of the aforementioned 1Password I am in the process of updating all my passwords to unique, current, and secure. I figure I will finish just in time to start the cycle all over again. 🤬

My suggestion is get a good password management system, there are several on the App Store, and use it diligently. Keychain is secure, bit it does not have the management features of 1Password and its kin,


MacBook Pro - Catalina 10.15.6
Safari 13.1.2
Music 1.0.6.10




iPhone 5s Version 9.3.2 iTunes 12.4.0.119
Re: Removing Cookies
plantsower #50225 10/15/18 10:47 PM
Joined: Aug 2009
Likes: 2
Moderator
Online
Moderator

Joined: Aug 2009
Likes: 2
Rita whether you know it or not you are using Keychain, otherwise you would be unable to logon to your Mac.


joemikeb • moderator
Re: Removing Cookies
joemikeb #50226 10/16/18 12:43 AM
Joined: Sep 2009
OP Offline

Joined: Sep 2009
Well, maybe I am on some level, but when I intentionally tried to use it, I didn't like it. And now, for some reason, my autofill has decided not to work most of the time. frown



Originally Posted By: joemikeb
Rita whether you know it or not you are using Keychain, otherwise you would be unable to logon to your Mac.


MacBook Pro - Catalina 10.15.6
Safari 13.1.2
Music 1.0.6.10




iPhone 5s Version 9.3.2 iTunes 12.4.0.119
Re: Removing Cookies
joemikeb #50229 10/16/18 10:57 AM
Joined: Aug 2009
Likes: 1
Online

Joined: Aug 2009
Likes: 1
Originally Posted By: joemikeb
I have a couple of hundred passwords and far too many are either duplicated, way too old, or grossly out of date. So with the help of the aforementioned 1Password I am in the process of updating all my passwords to unique, current, and secure.

I've posted this more than once before but never heard either an "Aye" or a "Nay", so I"m now soliciting opinions.

My feeling about passwords is that pretty darn near all of mine are innocuous in the sense that even if I were to give you my password and logon identity for most sites I visit you couldn't do me any worse damage than perhaps embarrass me by, for instance, filling up an eBay shopping cart for which you wouldn't be able to pay. At FTM, for instance, you couldn't begin to write a post that would sound like I'd written it, and, similarly, I'd not be at risk at most other sites I visit were my credentials to be compromised.

Where I'm of course going, is I use the same password at all those sites, although that's mitigated by the fact that my logon identities are an assortment of email addresses and screen names, and all that info is stored in my keychain for easy entry.

Any site at which money or important data is at risk is protected by a unique, extremely strong password which I change periodically and which is stored between my ears, not in my keychain.

What say the assembled masses? Is my logic fallacious, am I being naive and exposing myself, or does my approach make sense as I obviously think it does?

Thanks.


The new Great Equalizer is the SEND button.

In Memory of Harv: Those who can make you believe absurdities can make you commit atrocities. ~Voltaire
Re: Removing Cookies
plantsower #50230 10/16/18 01:20 PM
Joined: Aug 2009
Likes: 2
Moderator
Online
Moderator

Joined: Aug 2009
Likes: 2
Originally Posted By: plantsower
Well, maybe I am on some level, but when I intentionally tried to use it, I didn't like it. And now, for some reason, my autofill has decided not to work most of the time. frown

Autofill uses the keychain to store userid's and passwords and it still works, but in the data field you may see a little icon at the far right side, click on that and you will get a prompt asking what data you want to use. Select the data set and it will be filled in.


joemikeb • moderator
Re: Removing Cookies
artie505 #50231 10/16/18 02:06 PM
Joined: Aug 2009
Likes: 2
Moderator
Online
Moderator

Joined: Aug 2009
Likes: 2
Originally Posted By: artie505
I've posted this more than once before but never heard either an "Aye" or a "Nay", so I"m now soliciting opinions.

You know my opinion so let me pose a scenario for your consideration. A miscreant gets your password and goes browsing your various accounts to glean information — any information. Somewhere along the line they discover your bank, your credit card number, your social security number, your address, your telephone. A month or so later you receive a mortgage bill for the $500,000 house you just purchased in the Bahamas. You swear you did not buy it but it takes a court action and $10,000 in legal fees to get you out of the mess and the culprit gets a free luxury vacation in "your" house in the Bahamas.

On a smaller scale you get a bill from Acme Credit Card for $15,000 in charges made on a brand new credit card that was opened in your name. Or you go to book a room at your time-share only to find "you" have already used up all your credits for the year for a vacation someone else took.

Any security expert will tell you it is not a single big reveal that gets you it is the sum of dozens of tiny bits of information from a hundred sources that lead to the final big reveal. No matter how careful you are you leave crumbs of information about yourself when you cruise the web and using the same password everywhere simply makes the thief's job that much easier.

Do you lock your doors when you leave home? When you park your car, do you take the keys and put your belongings out of site or do you leave the doors unlocked and the keys in the ignition? I'm guessing that you DO lock your doors when you leave home and you DON'T leave the car doors unlocked with the keys in the ignition. Those are pretty standard security precautions. Just like using secure passwords and not reusing passwords on the internet. It is annoying to keep up with but there are a number of excellent tools to make the task tolerable, it only takes a little self discipline to use them.


joemikeb • moderator
Re: Removing Cookies
joemikeb #50234 10/16/18 04:09 PM
Joined: Aug 2009
Online

Joined: Aug 2009
Originally Posted By: joemikeb
Originally Posted By: plantsower
Would you explain what you mean by additional security allowances? I like the fact that I don't have to remember my passwords now. Would that still be the case?

Also, I just noticed that when I disable JavaScript, I cannot get into YouTube which I use a lot.

That question covers a lot of different areas and I don't remember them all but among the security changes are...
  • Requiring a user with admin privileges to go to System Preferences > Security & Privacy and specifically grant an app access to specific parts of the system. This is a one time step every time you install an app that requires access to parts of the system outside of the app's "sandbox".
  • with auto filed fields in Safari the user is required to enter their login password or fingerprint before allowing auto filling a field. That will happen every time that field is auto filled. (My wife just got a long email about that from our password manager 1Password justifying Apple's decision to do this.
  • This is independent of Apple but more and more critical sites are requiring "two-factor authentication."
As congress, and the administration are just now recognizing, the internet is a dangerous environment. Software companies are struggling not to keep up rather to not get any further behind. The same can be said of users and increased security will inevitably mean inconvenience. I have a couple of hundred passwords and far too many are either duplicated, way too old, or grossly out of date. So with the help of the aforementioned 1Password I am in the process of updating all my passwords to unique, current, and secure. I figure I will finish just in time to start the cycle all over again. 🤬

My suggestion is get a good password management system, there are several on the App Store, and use it diligently. Keychain is secure, bit it does not have the management features of 1Password and its kin,


What he said. wink

So far the extra security requirements under Mojave have not required me to use passwords, only to add applications to "Full Disk Access" or "Accessibility" under the Security and Privacy Preference pane.


On a Mac since 1984.
Currently: 27" iMacs, Macbook Air, macOS 10.15.x,; iPhones, iPods and iPads galore!
Re: Removing Cookies
plantsower #50235 10/16/18 04:16 PM
Joined: Aug 2009
Likes: 1
Online

Joined: Aug 2009
Likes: 1
Originally Posted By: plantsower
Also, I just noticed that when I disable JavaScript, I cannot get into YouTube which I use a lot.

That just registered.

Someone else will have to fill you in on the details, but JavaScript has nothing to do with (the dreaded) Java other than common nomenclature, and there's no particular need for you disable it.


The new Great Equalizer is the SEND button.

In Memory of Harv: Those who can make you believe absurdities can make you commit atrocities. ~Voltaire
Re: Removing Cookies
artie505 #50237 10/16/18 07:23 PM
Joined: Aug 2009
Likes: 2
Moderator
Online
Moderator

Joined: Aug 2009
Likes: 2
Javascript is the automation language underlaying HTML5 and critical to the function of virtually all e-commerce shopping carts, and many sites will not load or work correctly (ie. YouTube) if Javascript is deactivated. I suppose it is could be possible to use Javascript in an exploit, but no one is suggesting disabling it unless you are dealing with information the exposure of which could cause grave harm to the security of the nation (in other words military Top Secret) — or the corporate equivalent.

Java (with no script) is a full blown software development language that has been found to have vulnerabilities subject to exploitation. Today It is mostly confined to on-line gaming, specialized corporate applications, and some multi-platform open source applications such as OpenOffice. Even better, the vulnerabilities no longer exist in today's version of Java and it is as safe to use as any app or language. But like MacOS itself it is critical to keep Java up to date to maintain security.


joemikeb • moderator
Re: Removing Cookies
joemikeb #50238 10/16/18 09:07 PM
Joined: Sep 2009
OP Offline

Joined: Sep 2009
I will look for that next time. It is just weird that I've had no problems with autofill in the past, but now more times than not, it doesn't work. Thanks for the tip.



Originally Posted By: joemikeb
Originally Posted By: plantsower
Well, maybe I am on some level, but when I intentionally tried to use it, I didn't like it. And now, for some reason, my autofill has decided not to work most of the time. frown

Autofill uses the keychain to store userid's and passwords and it still works, but in the data field you may see a little icon at the far right side, click on that and you will get a prompt asking what data you want to use. Select the data set and it will be filled in.


MacBook Pro - Catalina 10.15.6
Safari 13.1.2
Music 1.0.6.10




iPhone 5s Version 9.3.2 iTunes 12.4.0.119
Re: Removing Cookies
artie505 #50239 10/16/18 09:10 PM
Joined: Sep 2009
OP Offline

Joined: Sep 2009
OK. Thanks.


Originally Posted By: artie505
Originally Posted By: plantsower
Also, I just noticed that when I disable JavaScript, I cannot get into YouTube which I use a lot.

That just registered.

Someone else will have to fill you in on the details, but JavaScript has nothing to do with (the dreaded) Java other than common nomenclature, and there's no particular need for you disable it.


MacBook Pro - Catalina 10.15.6
Safari 13.1.2
Music 1.0.6.10




iPhone 5s Version 9.3.2 iTunes 12.4.0.119
Re: Removing Cookies
joemikeb #50240 10/16/18 09:12 PM
Joined: Sep 2009
OP Offline

Joined: Sep 2009
Thanks. I didn't know there was a difference between java script and java.


Originally Posted By: joemikeb
Javascript is the automation language underlaying HTML5 and critical to the function of virtually all e-commerce shopping carts, and many sites will not load or work correctly (ie. YouTube) if Javascript is deactivated. I suppose it is could be possible to use Javascript in an exploit, but no one is suggesting disabling it unless you are dealing with information the exposure of which could cause grave harm to the security of the nation (in other words military Top Secret) — or the corporate equivalent.

Java (with no script) is a full blown software development language that has been found to have vulnerabilities subject to exploitation. Today It is mostly confined to on-line gaming, specialized corporate applications, and some multi-platform open source applications such as OpenOffice. Even better, the vulnerabilities no longer exist in today's version of Java and it is as safe to use as any app or language. But like MacOS itself it is critical to keep Java up to date to maintain security.


MacBook Pro - Catalina 10.15.6
Safari 13.1.2
Music 1.0.6.10




iPhone 5s Version 9.3.2 iTunes 12.4.0.119
Re: Removing Cookies
joemikeb #50244 10/17/18 02:01 PM
Joined: Aug 2017
Offline

Joined: Aug 2017
Originally Posted By: joemikeb
Java (with no script) is a full blown software development language that has been found to have vulnerabilities subject to exploitation. Today It is mostly confined to on-line gaming, specialized corporate applications, and some multi-platform open source applications.

Don’t forget the IoT (Internet of Things: thermostat, electronic locks, refrigerator, automated lamps, smart meters, cars, etc), and the servers that you get your content from (music, film, tv shows), and the machines that make the utility companies run: mostly Java. Its security will affect you, even if you keep it off your computer. You can’t keep it off other devices that you interact with, and services that you rely on to be secure. And many smaller IoT devices will never see an update or get patched; remaining insecure for the rest of their ‘life’.

Re: Removing Cookies
Urquhart #50245 10/17/18 02:32 PM
Joined: Sep 2009
OP Offline

Joined: Sep 2009
Luckily, I don't have most of those things.


Originally Posted By: Urquhart
Originally Posted By: joemikeb
Java (with no script) is a full blown software development language that has been found to have vulnerabilities subject to exploitation. Today It is mostly confined to on-line gaming, specialized corporate applications, and some multi-platform open source applications.

Don’t forget the IoT (Internet of Things: thermostat, electronic locks, refrigerator, automated lamps, smart meters, cars, etc), and the servers that you get your content from (music, film, tv shows), and the machines that make the utility companies run: mostly Java. Its security will affect you, even if you keep it off your computer. You can’t keep it off other devices that you interact with, and services that you rely on to be secure. And many smaller IoT devices will never see an update or get patched; remaining insecure for the rest of their ‘life’.


MacBook Pro - Catalina 10.15.6
Safari 13.1.2
Music 1.0.6.10




iPhone 5s Version 9.3.2 iTunes 12.4.0.119
Re: Removing Cookies
Urquhart #50250 10/17/18 05:10 PM
Joined: Aug 2009
Likes: 2
Moderator
Online
Moderator

Joined: Aug 2009
Likes: 2
Originally Posted By: Urquhart
Don’t forget the IoT (Internet of Things: thermostat, electronic locks, refrigerator, automated lamps, smart meters, cars, etc), and the servers that you get your content from (music, film, tv shows), and the machines that make the utility companies run: mostly Java. Its security will affect you, even if you keep it off your computer. You can’t keep it off other devices that you interact with, and services that you rely on to be secure. And many smaller IoT devices will never see an update or get patched; remaining insecure for the rest of their ‘life’.

Apparently congress is considering a law that would require even the existing IoT devices that cannot be updated to either be disabled, updated, or replaced. (Like that is actually going to happen with the existing congress mad )


joemikeb • moderator
Re: Removing Cookies
joemikeb #50261 10/18/18 04:40 PM
Joined: Sep 2009
Offline

Joined: Sep 2009
I started using Cookie a couple months ago because it was cheap and because the tech industry has become increasingly intrusive. I bought Radio Silence for the same reason. These are tools are would not have used in the past.

I haven't payed close attention to either one yet. Cookie deletes even the sites I've whitelisted. So I have to tweak it somehow. A manual would help, but of course there isn't one.

Last edited by deniro; 10/18/18 04:41 PM.
Page 3 of 5 1 2 3 4 5

Moderated by  alternaut, dianne, MacManiac 

Link Copied to Clipboard
Powered by UBB.threads™ PHP Forum Software 7.7.4
(Release build 20200307)
Responsive Width:

PHP: 7.3.15 Page Time: 0.033s Queries: 65 (0.018s) Memory: 0.8570 MB (Peak: 1.0438 MB) Data Comp: Zlib Server Time: 2020-09-18 17:42:46 UTC
Valid HTML 5 and Valid CSS