An open community 
of Macintosh users,
for Macintosh users.

FineTunedMac Dashboard widget now available! Download Here

Topic Options
#48215 - 03/13/18 09:45 AM Pages Suffix
Pendragon Online


Registered: 08/04/09
Loc: Georgetown, Texas, USA
I just noticed that new Pages documents all have the “.pages” suffix (which I do not want) in the file name. If I try to delete the suffix, it will automatically & instantly return.

As I vaguely recall, there was/is a setting to include (or not) this suffix. But now, I can no longer find such.

Is the problem with moi or is there a fix? confused
_________________________
Harv
27" i7 iMac (10.13.6), iPhone X (12.0)

Those who can make you believe absurdities can make you commit atrocities. ~Voltaire

Top
#48216 - 03/13/18 11:43 AM Re: Pages Suffix [Re: Pendragon]
MacManiac Offline
Moderator

Registered: 08/04/09
Loc: Paradise....on the central Ore...
Hi Harve,

Click on one of your new pages files to highlight it in the Finder, then pull down to Get Info (or use CMD-I) and you will see where the check box lives that allows you to see / hide the suffix for that file.....I believe it can apply to ALL Files of that same suffix, but you'll have to let us know for sure.

Good luck
_________________________
Freedom is never free....thank a Service member today.

Top
#48217 - 03/13/18 12:10 PM Re: Pages Suffix [Re: MacManiac]
Pendragon Online


Registered: 08/04/09
Loc: Georgetown, Texas, USA
Bingo! Embarrassingly easy. Then again, you professionals always make it look easy.

The only remaining nit, is that I can't get that "Hide extension" to be a default even though I clicked on the Change All.

_________________________
Harv
27" i7 iMac (10.13.6), iPhone X (12.0)

Those who can make you believe absurdities can make you commit atrocities. ~Voltaire

Top
#48218 - 03/13/18 12:18 PM Re: Pages Suffix [Re: Pendragon]
joemikeb Online
Moderator

Registered: 08/04/09
Loc: Fort Worth, Texas
The visibility of the file extension is a function of Finder not of the Application or its Files. Your file will have the .pages extension (suffix) whether you want it or not. Otherwise MacOS cannot tell which app to use to open the file when you click on it. However, there is an option to make the extension invisible. Go to Finder > Preferences > Advanced and UNcheck the item labeled "Show all filename extensions".

That is normally the default, but sometimes files from other apps or sources will come in with the setting for that unique file to have the extension visible. As Alternaut suggested that has to be changed on a file by file basis through the Get Info option.

NOTE: Many apps, including Pages, have an option in the Save dialog to show or not show the extension. You might check your copy of Pages to see if that option is checked or not. As a reminder, the option is only to HIDE the extension but the extension will still be there whether you want it or not.


Edited by joemikeb (03/13/18 12:31 PM)
Edit Reason: add note
_________________________
joemikeb • moderator

Top
#48220 - 03/13/18 12:40 PM Re: Pages Suffix [Re: joemikeb]
Pendragon Online


Registered: 08/04/09
Loc: Georgetown, Texas, USA
And to you kind, sir, many thanks as well. It has never ceased to amaze me, the detail that is behind the answer to what seems like a simple question...
_________________________
Harv
27" i7 iMac (10.13.6), iPhone X (12.0)

Those who can make you believe absurdities can make you commit atrocities. ~Voltaire

Top
#48221 - 03/13/18 01:05 PM Re: Pages Suffix [Re: joemikeb]
grelber Offline


Registered: 08/05/09
Loc: North of 49th ||
"Get Info" (via ⌘-i) generally holds a wealth of information and can be used to "tailor" a bunch of stuff.

Recently I recalled an ancient .rtf Word document which did not in its file designation contain the extension. (Aside: Most icons indicate the nature of the document — eg, RTF, PDF.)
I sent it via an email attachment, retaining a copy of same for myself, but when I examined it and then downloaded it, the attachment came up as an .mds document — something I had never seen or even heard of before. It looked like the original .rtf document, but there were some subtle differences. (Suffice it to say that I attached the .rtf extension, re-sent it, and all was right with the world.)

Another aside: I designate all Word files as .rtf (rather than .doc or .docx) because at least in the past many recipients could not open Word documents; .rtf at least allowed such. Moreover, with very little difference in appearance, .rtf specification allowed the size of the document to be very much smaller (at least 80% smaller) than the equivalent .doc or .docx document.

Top

Moderator:  alternaut, dianne, dkmarsh